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David Coucheron In San Miguel de Allende


San Miguel enthusiastically opens its arms to returning Norwegian-born violin sensation David Coucheron, the youngest concertmaster in any major U.S. orchestra. Get ready to hear the “creamy highly expressive ... sound from his Stradivarius” (as described by the Fort worth Star-Telegram) from this charming and dynamic, crowd-favourite in two concerts featuring different programs on Friday March 15 and Saturday March 16 at 5pm at St. Paul’s Church on Calle Cardo.

In his previous concerts with Pro Musica, David sold out quickly, and it’s no surprise. The illustrious violin prodigy began playing a quarter-sized violin at age 2, and at 25, made history by joining the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra as Leader of the Orchestra. A highly sought after soloist as well, he has graced the stages of Carnegie Hall and the Kennedy Center, London's Wigmore Hall, and events such as the Olympic Winter Games.  He has performed with many prestigious orchestras and has recorded two albums with his sister, Julie, who will accompany him on piano.

On Friday, David will play works by Frank, Prokiev, Tchaikovsky and Kreisler. A violin prodigy himself, Kreisler’s works were often attributed to earlier composers as he did not want to appear egotistical. Only later did people realize that the astounding compositions were actually his. Preludium and Allegro are excellent examples of the incredible talent that he demonstrated, virtuoso pieces that many violinists will not even attempt.  Frank’s Sonata in A Major, originally written as a wedding present for his friend Eugene Ysaÿe (the equal of Kreisler in his playing), is undoubtedly one of the greatest works in the violin repertoire. Tchaikovsky's Danse Russe comes from the same lineage of character dances from his ballets - Swan Lake, the Nutcracker, and Sleeping Beauty, and will be sure to have you tapping your feet!. Prokofiev’s Sonata No. 2 in D Major, though composed during the Second World War still carries surprisingly joyous and cheerful tones in its magnificent unfolding.

On Saturday, audiences will enjoy works by Beethoven, Vaughn-Williams and Saraste, and the spectacular virtuoso Conus's Violin Concerto for piano & violin.  Ralph Vaughn-Williams’ The Lark Ascending is a joyous paen to nature with its soaring melody and bird song and this arrangement for violin and piano will show it in a new light.  . Beethoven’s Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 8 in G Major was composed when he was both Vienna's premier piano virtuoso and a violist in the Bonn Court Orchestra and is a striking example of his mature works, despite his deafness. Sarasate’s Zapateado, comes from his Spanish Dances, his most iconic works. A flamenco piece, it employs a variety of techniques including harmonics, double stops, left-hand pizzicato, and passages high on the G string, all with impressive refinement. The Conus Violin Concerto displays techniques and movement unique to the work, and he called it a Concerto, rather than a Sonata, because of it symphonic structure.  . It’s simply breathtaking.

Later Event: March 22
Zuill Bailey