Celebrate Canada’s 150th Anniversary with Canada’s Bravour Piano Trio!
Dec
1
to Dec 3

Celebrate Canada’s 150th Anniversary with Canada’s Bravour Piano Trio!

Get ready to celebrate Canada’s sesquicentennial with the “flawless technique” and “dazzling panache” (as described by the Toronto Star) of the Canadian wonder: the Bravour Piano Trio! Composed of leading members of Canada’s great orchestras, we come together to celebrate the diversity and virtuosity of these phenomenal talents in two marvellous concerts on December 1st & 3rd, Friday at5 pm & Sunday at 4 pm, at St. Paul’s church on Calle Cardo.

The Bravour Piano Trio represents the collaboration of three of the most exceptionally skilled musicians in the country: Jethro Marks, principal viola with the National Arts Centre Orchestra, Mauro Bertoli, Professor of Piano at Ottowa University, and Paul Marleyn, professor of Cello at Manitoba University. Friday’s concert includes the Brahms Trio, Piazolla's Grand Tango and Schuman's Marchebilder. Sunday's program showcases the Smetana Trio, Mendelssohn's Sonata and Prokofiev's Sonata, among other works.

Violist Jethro Marks was a founding member of the Zukerman Chamber Players, as well as the Principal Violist of the National Arts Centre Orchestra in Ottawa. Born into a musical family in Vancouver, Jethro studied violin as a child, debuting at 17 with the Loudoun Symphony in Virginia with a performance of Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto. Shortly thereafter, he changed instruments, inspired by the viola, and grew as both an independent artist and chamber musician, performing at prestigious festivals and music halls around the world such as Carnegie Hall, Alice Tully Hall, and the Royal Albert Hall.  

Italo-Canadian Pianist, Mauro Bertoli, established his residence in Ottawa in 2009 after taking the international community by storm with his incomparable technique and sensational sensitivity.

Bravour Piano Trio.jpg

After receiving the first prize in several International piano competitions, he recently debuted at the illustrious International Piano Festival of Brescia and Bergamo. A very active international soloist and chamber musician, the Toronto Star Raved about Mauro’s performance, saying that the author felt "....dazzled by (the) up-and-coming pianist ...with deep musicality...Here is a newcomer to watch out for."

Cellist Paul Marleyn also resides in Ottawa, and mentors an award-winning studio of young cellists at the University. When he’s not touring in North America, Europe and Asia, he participates in a wide array of Summer festivals, including the International Cello Festival of Canada, and guides the Winnipeg’s Agassiz Chamber Music Festival as Artistic Director. A prolific recording artist, he has recorded with an abundance of music labels.

Tickets for the concerts at St. Paul’s are $150, $300 and $400 pesos donation each, and are on sale at La Tienda in the Biblioteca Pública; La Conexión; only at Aldama 3; the School of Arts at the Instituto Allende, Ancha de San Antonio 22, and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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Nov
18
5:00 PM17:00

Vienna Kammersymphonie

The Vienna Kammersymphonie, loosely translated as the Vienna Chamber Symphony, will give one concert for Pro Musica on Saturday, November 18 at 5 pm at St. Paul's Church.  The Kammersymphonie is an elite ensemble of six Austrian musicians; string quartet, double base and piano; which specializes in playing full-scale symphonic works with their own arrangements. This is a strongly emerging trend in classical music as more people want to hear their favorite works, but not in an enormous hall and at the price of a visit to the symphony. Pro Musica has been lucky enough to secure the Kammersymphonie as part of their Latin American tour when San Miguel audiences will experience the unique, creamy sound of great Viennese string playing. 

 

The ensemble of impressively gifted musicians comprises Nadja Kalmykova (1st violin), Aya Georgieva (2nd violin), Ljuba Kalmykova (viola), Sergio Mastro (violoncello), Benedict Ziervogel (double bass) and Alvaro Siviero (piano). Founded in 2006, the “Year of Mozart”, they were hailed in Austria as the best performers in an epic year of music-making dedicated to the famed composer, and went on to tour worldwide.

 

As well as performing well known music by the great names, such as Beethoven and Mahler, the Kammersymphonie also specialize in reviving overlooked musical gems by composers whose works are less often performed, for example Erich Korngold and Hans Gál.  Pieces by all these maestros will be highlighted in the concert, including a movement from Mahler's Symphony No. 4. Mahler conducted both the Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic in the early 1900s, and in the Vienna Philharmonic he was unanimously voted to be the Music Director. This caused a stir (and spoke highly of his influence) as Vienna was traditionally anti-Semitic. Under Mahler’s guidance both the Vienna and New York Philharmonic led the world, and continue to do so . The concert will feature the first movement of Mahler's Symphony No. 4. Another beloved work, Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 3 in C Minor will be performed in its entirety. The concerto was premiered in 1803 in a concert of his own works, spurned by a contest between Schickaneder'sTheater-an-der-Wien and von Braun's Kärtnertor-theater.  Expect fireworks from maestro Siviero at the keyboard!

 

Mahler's fellow countryman Hans Gál, fled Hitler, but was interned for a time by the British. A child prodigy, Gál was 13 when he composed the Five Intermezzos that we will hear. The concert also includes Erich Korngold's Märchenbilder, a fitting match to complement Gál's Intermezzi. Korngold was a sensation even among contemporary masters like Mahler, and one reviewer raved about his, “...astounding feats of composition and of piano-playing, in which the composer's age is not to be taken into consideration."

Tickets for the concerts at St. Paul’s are $150, $300 and $400 pesos donation each, and are on sale at La Tienda in the Biblioteca Pública and online through our website on the Buy Tickets tab at the top of the Home Page; and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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Nicholas Kitchen of the Borromeo String Quartet Performs Beethoven Violin Sonatas
Nov
12
5:00 PM17:00

Nicholas Kitchen of the Borromeo String Quartet Performs Beethoven Violin Sonatas

Why is Beethoven such a powerful force, hundreds of years after his death? Widely considered the greatest composer to have lived, Beethoven’s music evokes deep personal responses, and has inspired listeners for two centuries. On Sunday, November 12th at 5 pm at St. Paul’s Church on Calle Cardo, Nicholas Kitchen, revered violinist, will perform an all-Beethoven concert, focusing on some of his best known works.

Nicholas Kitchen’s eclectic musical interests inspired him to create the Borromeo String Quartet, a now world famous ensemble; Living Archive, a project documenting the nature of live music and living classical artists; and MusicKitchen, a program to promote creativity and inspire through music. Currently in Boston, he teaches at the New England Conservatory of Music. A great innovator and performer, he is captivating performer to hear and watch.

Ludwig van Beethoven was the predominant musical figure between the Classical and Romantic eras, establishing his name in music history as no one has since. Nicholas will perform several of his Sonatas for piano and violin. Rooted in the techniques of Hayden and Mozart, he superseded these  delving into concepts of humanism and nationalism, inspired by the literary works of Goethe and Friedrich von Schiller, which he transformed into music of sublime meaning and in so doing brought musical enlightenment to the mysteries of life .

It’s commonly known that Beethoven was nearly deaf by the end of his life. Beginning in his twenties, his hearing loss led him from the spotlight of performance and conducting to composing in private, with many of his most admired works composed during the contemplative and serene period at the end of his life. Known as a virtuoso pianist, few realize that he was a skilled viola player as well, working with the finest group in Europe at the time, the Bonn Court Orchestra.

Beethoven dedicated many works to friends and patrons. His first three violin sonatas were dedicated to Antonio Salieri. Technically impressive and unusual in the equal emphasis of both piano and violin, these sonatas would not have fitted in well with the popular salon music of the time. He pushed the equality of the “duo sonata” a step farther in the Sonata in G Major, dedicated to friend and patron, Archduke Rudolph (as was the so-called "Archduke Trio".) At that time the piano was transitioning into our modern pianoforte and we will hear the wider dynamic range well illustrated by this work. This is all true of the famous and powerful Kreutzer Sonata, dedicated to Rodolphe Kreutzer, a fellow violinist who proved unable to meet the works' technical challenges.  While modern violin students still battle to execute its complex etudes, this is one of Kitchen's favourite works and no violinist living plays it with more passion and virtuosity.

Tickets for the concerts at St. Paul’s are $150, $300 and $400 pesos donation each, and are on sale at La Tienda in the Biblioteca Pública; La Conexión; only at Aldama 3; the School of Arts at the Instituto Allende, Ancha de San Antonio 22, and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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Nicholas Kitchen, First Violinist of the Boromeo String Quartet Make His San Miguel Solo Debut
Nov
12
5:00 PM17:00

Nicholas Kitchen, First Violinist of the Boromeo String Quartet Make His San Miguel Solo Debut

Violin master Nicholas Kitchen will make his San Miguel solo debut with Pro Musica on Sunday November 12th at 5 pm Praised by the New York Times as "thrilling, vibrant and captivating," he is an outstanding virtuoso player. Kitchen is not only a chamber musician, but also teacher, filmmaker, technical innovator and arts administrator, not to mention the founder of the Borromeo String Quartet, and two music education and conservation programs, Living Archive, and MusicKitchen. Amazingly accomplished and wildly talented, this is a unique all-Beethoven concert not to be missed!

Originally from Durham, North Carolina, Kitchen was raised by a family of passionate musicians: his mother, a violinist, founded the String School at Duke and worked closely with the Greensboro Symphony; his father, a choir-master and organist, founded a chamber orchestra at

St. Stephen's Episcopal Church and was also a professor at Duke. Setting the stage for a bright future, Nicholas preformed often at Duke as a child, nurtured by the path of his parents. At the tender age of 16, he began his studies at the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia.

Upon completing his college experience, an inspired Nicholas founded the Borromeo String Quartet, which skyrocketed in popularity, receiving the Cleveland Quartet Award from Chamber Music America, the Martin S. Segal Award from Lincoln Center, and the Avery Fisher Career Grant.  They now play over 100 concerts a year and are the quartet in residence at the New England Conservatory of Music, where Nicholas teaches.

Nicholas has been given a special charge to play and travel with the Goldberg violin "Guarneri del Gesù", on loan to him from the Library of Congress with the intention of moving Mr. Goldberg’s artistic vision forward. For many years, he also played the A.J. Fletcher Stradivarius, but now shares it with his friend, the Borromeo second violinist, Kristopher Tong. He will bring the Guarneri with him to San Miguel.  Kitchen particularly enjoys the Beethoven violin sonatas, which will be strongly featured in his concert on Sunday.

Like most living classical masters, Nicholas has recorded extensively and given concerts in some of the world’s greatest concert halls, premiering new works such as the violin concerto by Stephen Jaffe, which was written for him. But unique to Nicholas are his forays into world music, such as collaborations with Turkish traditional musician Erkan Ogur in Istanbul, drawing animations to accompany live classical performance, and creating a new classical media library to preserve performances of the living artists of today called, appropriately, the Living Archive.

Tickets for the concerts at St. Paul’s are $150, $300 and $400 pesos donation each, and are on sale at La Tienda in the Biblioteca Pública; La Conexión; only at Aldama 3; the School of Arts at the Instituto Allende, Ancha de San Antonio 22, and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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Jenny Lin, Internationally Acclaimed Pianist, plays Liszt, Schumann and Scriabin
Oct
8
5:00 PM17:00

Jenny Lin, Internationally Acclaimed Pianist, plays Liszt, Schumann and Scriabin

Jenny Lin is a surprising and eclectic talent! An immensely gifted Steinway artist, she is also a captivating performer, a world-renowned pianist and an out-of-the-box thinker. This Taiwan-born New Yorker has received rave reviews from the New York Times and the Washington Post (among many others) praising her “remarkable technique” and calling her “one of the most interesting pianists in America right now.” Don’t miss her San Miguel debut at St Paul’s Church, on Sunday, October 8 at 5 pm.

Franz Liszt was the first pop superstar. Mobbed by the music public of his day, he was a greatly revered artist, known for his free spirit, inspiring “Lisztomania”, a term coined by the poet Heine to describe how women reacted to his recitals with absolute hysteria.    All the works featured in Lin’s concert are really fantasies, despite their varying titles. Liszt's Sonata in B minor is no exception, with a long, free-form composition but with thematically connected movements. This structure, coupled with liberty of form, needs a pianist with a phenomenal technique and great inner inspiration to bring out the genius of the piece, allowing the decorative details to meld effortlessly with the overall theme. 

In her concert, Lin will also perform Schumann’s famous, Fantasie, which was dedicated to Liszt, who was also one of the few pianists able to execute the technical challenges of the work.  Liszt never performed it, although he did teach it; but Clara, Schumann’s wife, added it to her repertoire.  Liszt and Schumann were close friends, sharing musical inspirations and dedicating many works to one another, traces of which can be seen peppered throughout their works. The Fantasie was intended as a tribute to Beethoven; but was only completed thanks to a large donation from Liszt. Premiered in 1845, Schumann was too ill to attend its opening and Liszt, who was present, wrote to him: "The Fantasie that you have dedicated to me is a work of the highest rank. I am truly proud of the honour you have done me in dedicating so grand a composition to me…It is a noble work, worthy of Beethoven, whose career… it is supposed to represent".

Scriabin's "Sonata-Fantasy", the second of his piano sonatas, represents 10 individual moments in his stylistic development. The early sonatas were inspired by Chopin and Liszt, although the later ones diverged significantly from the familiar form, allowing for radical exploration. Even in the earliest sonatas, including this, we can see Scriabin’s development of a strong individual voice.

Tickets for the concerts at St. Paul’s are $150, $300 and $400 pesos donation each, and are on sale at La Tienda in the Biblioteca Pública; La Conexión; only at Aldama 3; the School of Arts at the Instituto Allende, Ancha de San Antonio 22, and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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The Great Piano Sonatas in concert with Steinway Artist Jenny Lin
Oct
8
5:00 PM17:00

The Great Piano Sonatas in concert with Steinway Artist Jenny Lin

This is a one off opportunity to hear what the Washington Post describes as “one of the most interesting pianists in America". Jenny Lin has been hailed for her “gift for melodic flow” and “remarkable technical command” by The New York Times. A renowned Steinway artist, Lin’s “confident fingers” and “spectacular technique”;  will make their San Miguel debut at St Paul’s Church, calle Cardo on Sunday, October 8 at 5 pm.

Jenny Lin embodies a surprising amalgamation of qualities and talents. This Taiwan-born New Yorker grew up in Austria; she is as elegant as she is accessible, and in her technique, she is as powerful as she is refined. Gramophone Magazine called her an “an exceptionally sensitive pianist”, however she’s equally known for her charisma and strong stage presence. Additionally, she holds a bachelor’s degree in German Literature from The Johns Hopkins University. Clearly a fascinating woman beyond her immense musical talents, this year will include international tours, including accompanying Phillip Glass in his Piano Etudes, her debut in Lincoln Center’s Great Performers Series, and the release of Melody’s Mostly Musical Day, her illustrated album for children.

To name her accolades would overwhelm the page, but among them are concerts in Carnegie Hall, Avery Fisher Hall, the Kennedy Center, and MoMA, and a multitude of international festivals and concerts. Her discography includes over 30 recordings, and a central role in “Cooking for Jenny” by Elemental Films, a musical documentary about her journey to Spain to meet and work with composer Javier López de Guereña. Recent and popular recordings include, Get Happy, a Broadway tribute with arrangements from many of piano’s greats and “The Spirio Sessions”, a two-piano disc with Uri Caine, and epic renditions of Liszt’s Sonata and Schumann’s Fantasie, both of which will be featured in her San Miguel concert.

All-Music Guide described Lin’s technique as “nothing less than superhuman”. Inspiration and dedication produce Lin’s incredible recordings and performances and Lin is so deeply inspired by the music she interprets that it’s no wonder she leaves her audiences spell-bound. Performing some of her favourites, like Scriabin, Schumann and Liszt for her Pro Musica debut, we know our audiences will feel as inspired as she does. As Gramophone Magazine said of Lin’s recordings of Stravinsky’s solo piano music, it is “another notable achievement from this gifted and imaginative artist.” We can’t wait for you to share in her imaginative gifts as well.

Tickets for the concerts at St. Paul’s are $150, $300 and $400 pesos donation each, and are on sale at La Tienda in the Biblioteca Pública; La Conexión; only at Aldama 3; the School of Arts at the Instituto Allende, Ancha de San Antonio 22, and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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