Zuill Bailey
Mar
22
to Mar 24

Zuill Bailey

Called  “one of the finest cellists alive today" by Classical Net, Zuill Bailey has been described as “gifted with a beautiful tone, fabulous technique and sensitive interpretation" by Audiophile Audition. Zuill's rare blend of show-stopping charisma, technical prowess and monumental artistry has cemented his place as the one of the world's most sought after cellists. He will debut in San Miguel in two concerts on Friday, March 22 & Sunday, March 24 at 5 pm at St. Paul’s Church on Calle Cardo playing an array of exquisite compositions, including the Tales of Hemingway, for which he recently won a Grammy Award.
 
Internationally renowned soloist, recitalist, Artistic Director, teacher and now Grammy Award Winner are  just some of Zuill's accomplishments. His New York debut of Beethoven Cello Sonatas at the Metropolitan Museum sold out, and his album, “Bach Cello suites,” topped the Classical Billboard Charts. in 2017 Tales of Hemingway, composed for him by Michael Daugherty  is inspired by the writings of the American author, and garnered him best solo performance, while the album won best composition and best compendium.   “Tales of Hemingway portrays four of the novelist’s stories in music of sweeping drama and poetry. Daugherty sends the cello soaring and singing as he summons key moments in the Hemingway books. The solo writing calls for an artist of eloquent persuasion, and Zuill Bailey more than meets the score’s demands with "playing that combines fervor and poetry,” said Gramophone Magazine.  This wonderful piece will feature in Sunday's concert.

On Friday, concertgoers will enjoy works by Boccherini, Beethoven, and Chopin, among others. Bach's Sonata No. 1, which hearkens back to a time when the cello was emancipated from the bass line and opened up a  wide range of techniques to the cellist. Cello prodigy Boccherini was a prolific composer and virtuoso player; when a violinist was missing in chamber music, he would play the violin part, on the cello! Audiences will hear his magnificent Sonata in C Major. Chopin's impeccable Polish-inspired Polonaise Brillante and the strikingly beautiful posthumously published Nocturnes, arranged for cello will both be featured in the concert.

 
On Sunday, listeners will delight in music by Bach, Beethoven, and the Grammy-winning Tales of Hemingway. Beethoven’s Cello Sonata No. 2 exhibits more complexity in both its variety and scope than most works of its time and is seen as more ambitious than his first Concerto. Bach's unaccompanied works for cello and violin are among the greatest works for strings, composed when he was writing secular music.  The Suite for Cello No. 1 is one of the most beloved compositions of all time. Tales of Hemingway draws on extra-musical themes, not just of literature, but also history and the arts. This amazing piece takes a page out of literary history and turns it into music, honoring Ernest Hemingway’s most captivating works.
 

Tickets for the concert at St. Paul’s are $150, $300 and $400 pesos donation each, and are on sale at the Bookshop  in the Biblioteca Pública; Solutions, Recreo 11 and through our website with no booking fee, and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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David Coucheron In San Miguel de Allende
Mar
15
to Mar 16

David Coucheron In San Miguel de Allende

San Miguel enthusiastically opens its arms to returning Norwegian-born violin sensation David Coucheron, the youngest concertmaster in any major U.S. orchestra. Get ready to hear the “creamy highly expressive ... sound from his Stradivarius” (as described by the Fort worth Star-Telegram) from this charming and dynamic, crowd-favourite in two concerts featuring different programs on Friday March 15 and Saturday March 16 at 5pm at St. Paul’s Church on Calle Cardo.

In his previous concerts with Pro Musica, David sold out quickly, and it’s no surprise. The illustrious violin prodigy began playing a quarter-sized violin at age 2, and at 25, made history by joining the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra as Leader of the Orchestra. A highly sought after soloist as well, he has graced the stages of Carnegie Hall and the Kennedy Center, London's Wigmore Hall, and events such as the Olympic Winter Games.  He has performed with many prestigious orchestras and has recorded two albums with his sister, Julie, who will accompany him on piano.

On Friday, David will play works by Frank, Prokiev, Tchaikovsky and Kreisler. A violin prodigy himself, Kreisler’s works were often attributed to earlier composers as he did not want to appear egotistical. Only later did people realize that the astounding compositions were actually his. Preludium and Allegro are excellent examples of the incredible talent that he demonstrated, virtuoso pieces that many violinists will not even attempt.  Frank’s Sonata in A Major, originally written as a wedding present for his friend Eugene Ysaÿe (the equal of Kreisler in his playing), is undoubtedly one of the greatest works in the violin repertoire. Tchaikovsky's Danse Russe comes from the same lineage of character dances from his ballets - Swan Lake, the Nutcracker, and Sleeping Beauty, and will be sure to have you tapping your feet!. Prokofiev’s Sonata No. 2 in D Major, though composed during the Second World War still carries surprisingly joyous and cheerful tones in its magnificent unfolding.

On Saturday, audiences will enjoy works by Beethoven, Vaughn-Williams and Saraste, and the spectacular virtuoso Conus's Violin Concerto for piano & violin.  Ralph Vaughn-Williams’ The Lark Ascending is a joyous paen to nature with its soaring melody and bird song and this arrangement for violin and piano will show it in a new light.  . Beethoven’s Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 8 in G Major was composed when he was both Vienna's premier piano virtuoso and a violist in the Bonn Court Orchestra and is a striking example of his mature works, despite his deafness. Sarasate’s Zapateado, comes from his Spanish Dances, his most iconic works. A flamenco piece, it employs a variety of techniques including harmonics, double stops, left-hand pizzicato, and passages high on the G string, all with impressive refinement. The Conus Violin Concerto displays techniques and movement unique to the work, and he called it a Concerto, rather than a Sonata, because of it symphonic structure.  . It’s simply breathtaking.

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Lysander Trio in San Miguel de Allende
Mar
8
to Mar 10

Lysander Trio in San Miguel de Allende

As the concert season comes into its peak, the much lauded New York-based Lysander Piano Trio will make its debut in San Miguel de Allende. Attendees will be treated to the passionate and innovative playing of its three members: Itamar Zorman on violin,  Liza Stepanova on piano, and Michael Katz on cello. Two performances are offered on March 8th and 10th at St. Paul’s Church on Calle Cardo, both at 5 p.m.
 
Concert goers may recall the electric performance last season of the group’s violinist, Itamar Zorman along with pianist, Yuan Li. This time the entire trio of Lysander talent will be with us in San Miguel for an excellent opportunity to experience their dynamic, collaborative playing with “...an uncommon degree of heart-on-the-sleeve emotional frankness” as described by the Washington Post.
 
Israeli-born Zorman and Katz along with Belarus native Stepanova, formed the trio at Julliard where they met in 2009. The awards and accolades of this threesome, both individually and collectively have poured in ever since.
 
Singled out for their exuberant and youthful approach to chamber music, their combined talents, come together to mesmerize worldwide audiences with their varied and eclectic repertoire. Their program choices illustrate their impressive range and innovation in connecting chamber music across other genres and practices. San Miguel’s concert will be no exception.
 
Friday’s performance is aptly entitled “Young Trailblazers”. We will hear Debussy’s romantic piano trio in G major. Still a student when he composed the trio, it is doubtful the loose sonata style was ever performed in Debussy’s lifetime. Brahm’s piano trio in B major composed when he was just twenty, is one of few chamber works to have a major/minor composition. This program also includes a commissioned piece from young Israeli composer, Gilad Cohen. “Around the Cauldron” takes its name and content from Shakespeare’s Macbeth. The drama and dissonance of this piece puts it squarely into a contemporary realm and conjures the three witches casting their spell with inventive and playful sound.
 
Sunday’s performance “Light and Matter”, is a program inspired by Finnish composer, Kaija Saariaho’s commissioned piece from 2014 of the same name. The selections are Russian composer Alexander Scriabin’s Nocturne Op. 5, whose music Tolstoy described as “a sincere expression of genius.” We will also hear Haydn’s sweetly melancholic Trio in F-sharp minor, and Faure’s Piano Trio in D minor. First performed in Paris in 1923, Faure’s trio was praised for its “elegant clarity and serenity”. Finally, Schubert’s Piano trio in E-flat major, considered his masterpiece, carries the listener on a rollercoaster of musical brilliance.
 
The Lysander Piano trio, which takes its name from the besotted hero of Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night’s Dream is in high demand and touring extensively in 2019. Don’t miss this opportunity to experience the virtuosity and innovation of these stand-out musicians in San Miguel.
 
Tickets for the concerts at St. Paul’s are $150, $300 and $400 pesos donation each, and are on sale at the Bookshop in the Biblioteca Pública; Solutions, Recreo 11 and through our website with no booking fee, and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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Ran Dank, Israel’s Dazzling Classical Pianist, Plays for Pro Musica
Mar
1
to Mar 3

Ran Dank, Israel’s Dazzling Classical Pianist, Plays for Pro Musica

Praised by the New York Times for his “vivacious playing”, Ran Dank’s intoxicating vigor, matched with intuitive interpretation and delicate precision, has audiences begging for more everywhere he performs. The Washington Post said it all in a recent review: "Dank played with ... explosive force and triumphant exultation". A classical piano phenomenon, he will perform for us two entirely different programs, including both crowd-pleasing classics and intriguing contemporary works. Returning by popular demand to San Miguel for two unforgettable concerts on Friday and Sunday, March 1st at 5 pm and March 3rd at 4:00pm at St. Paul’s Church on Calle Cardo, his awe-inspiring performances are not to be missed!


A Master’s graduate from the Julliard School, Ran Dank is Director of Piano studies at the University of Charleston, and also Artistic Director of their International Piano Series. Dank is no stranger to prestigious performances, playing both as a soloist and with many illustrious orchestras, such as the Jerusalem and Phoenix symphonies, and at festivals such as the Chopin Festival in Warsaw. Recently, Dank joined forces with fellow pianist and Pro Musica artist Adam Golka to perform in the Beethoven Sonata Marathon by WQXR. Dank performed the "Tempest" and "Moonlight" sonatas, much to the delight of his listeners.


On Friday, the program includes Brahms' Sonata in F minor, Gershwin’s Seven Virtuoso Studies interpreted by Earl Wild, and Nikolai Kapustin’s Sonata No. 2. Brahms composed the Sonata in F minor at only 20 years old, his third and last piano sonata, and arguably his greatest. Earl Wild, a famous ragtime composer, based his Virtuoso Studies on the music of his idol George Gershwin. A highly talented pianist, Wild recorded over 700 piano works and received both a Grammy Award and the Hungarian government's Liszt Medal. Kapustin's remarkable Sonata No 2 inspires visions of modern jazz's light-fingered Dave Brubeck, and of tantalizing folkloric rhythms reminiscent of Bartók’s compositions.


On Sunday, the program showcases a cornucopia of critically acclaimed pieces, ranging from classical to modern, including Liszt’s Fantasia and Fugue in G Minor and his Fantasy on Themes from The Marriage of Figaro (the latter arranged by Ferruccio Busoni and Ran Dank). The centerpiece of the program will be Schumann’s great Kreisleriana, one of the monumental masterpieces of the keyboard. We will also hear Bach's dramatic Fantasia and Fugue in G Minor for organ arranged by Liszt for piano in his homage to the Father of Music. Finally, we will hear Liszt's light hearted Fantasy on themes from Mozart's opera, The Marriage of Figaro.


Tickets for the concerts at St. Paul’s are $150, $350 and $450 pesos donation each, and are on sale at the Bookshop in the Biblioteca Pública; Solutions, Recreo 11 and through our website with no booking fee, and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.


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San Francisco’s Renowned Telegraph String Quartet to Perform Two Concerts
Feb
22
to Feb 23

San Francisco’s Renowned Telegraph String Quartet to Perform Two Concerts

Fresh off the plane from the Bay Area, the Telegraph String Quartet has a unique and delicious pair of concerts for San Miguel’s classical music enthusiasts. Praised by the San Francisco Chronicle as playing with “a combination of brilliance and subtlety”, the Telegraph String Quartet has delighted audiences worldwide since their founding in 2013. On Friday, February 22nd, and Saturday, February 23rd, both at 5 pm, they promise to bring precisely that intoxicating blend to the stage, performing two different programmes at St. Paul’s Church on Calle Cardo.

 

Currently the Quartet in Residence at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, these phenomenal players won the Grand Prize at the 2014 Fischoff Chamber Music competition only a short time after they formed. The Quartet is made up of Eric Chin and Joseph Maile, violins; Pei-Ling Lin, viola and Jeremiah Shaw, cello. Each is a noted chamber musician on the international stage, where they’ve graced such illustrious stages as Carnegie Hall, San Francisco’s Herbst Theatre and the Emilia Romagna Festival. Last year they released their debut album, Into the Light, with great critical acclaim.

 

Friday’s program includes works by Dvorak and Beethoven. During Dvořák’s Slavic period he composed not only his immensely popular Slavonic Dances, but also the Quartet in E-flat, which we will hear. Commissioned by Jean Becker, leader of one of Europe’s most important chamber ensembles, Dvorak was asked by Becker to compose “in the Slav spirit”. The refined melodies, immaculate composition and elegance rank this work as one of the finest quartets in the repertoire. Beethoven’s last six quartets are famous for their passion and freedom of expression, painting a picture of an unseen player in each movement. On Friday, we will hear the second of the series: the Quartet in B-flat Major. Unusual among quartets for its surprising six movement structure, this profound opus examines the limits of what can be expressed in music, re-defining the tenuous relationship between form and meaning.

 

Saturday’s program will feature Mendelssohn, Ravel and Dvorak. Mendelssohn was a superstar in his time, and we will hear one of his most phenomenal compositions; the centerpiece of his mature string quartets: the Quartet in D Major; his personal favorite. Ravel’s Quartet comes from a remarkable artistic moment prior to World War I. At a time of risk and experimentation, composers toyed with the commonly held ideas of rhythm and tonality. Ravel was no exception, explored multi-tonality through simultaneous instruments in different keys. His quartet is a reflection of this and is sure to intrigue and captivate. Dvorak’s charming Cypresses will also be performed.  It was written out of love for the actress Josefina Cermakova, but he ultimately married her younger sister; although he and Josefina remained close friends!

 

Tickets for the concerts at St. Paul’s are $150, $300 and $400 pesos donation each, and are on sale at the Bookshop  in the Biblioteca Pública; Solutions, Recreo 11 and through our website with no booking fee, and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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Serbia’s Artist of the Century: Violin Superstar Stefan Milenkovich Debuts for Pro Musica
Feb
11
12:30 PM12:30

Serbia’s Artist of the Century: Violin Superstar Stefan Milenkovich Debuts for Pro Musica

Stefan Milenkovich performed for U.S. President Ronald Reagan in Washington, DC, at the age of 10, the following year, he played for Mikhail Gorbachev in Belgrade, Serbia, and at 14 he played for Pope John Paul II. If this were not enough, by 16, he had given his 1000th concert! The Washington Post described him as “magical” and possessing “dazzling virtuosity” from one of his many concerts at the Kennedy Center. Accompanied by renowned pianist Marta Aznavoorian, he will perform two different and not be missed concerts on Friday and Saturday, 15 & 16 February, 2019, at 4:00pm at St. Paul’s Church on Calle Cardo.

If such a spectacular career were not enough, Milenkovich has was named Serbia’s Artist of the Century, the Most Humane Person, and Brand Personality of the Year! It is not surprising, then, that he is an internationally sought-after soloist and recitalist who frequently appears in the world’s greatest concert halls, such as the Kennedy Center, Carnegie Hall and as a guest with the Berlin Symphony and the Helsinki Philharmonic.

On Friday, Milenkovich will play works by Debussy, Gershwin and Tchaikovsky, and more. Debussy’s Sonata for Violin and Piano is a powerful testament to the composer's life with the music exhibiting a lifetime's experience of international music, poetry and art. He himself performed it in his last concert - and said it was "so terribly melancholy that I can't say whether one should laugh or cry. Perhaps both?" Gershwin’s Three Preludes, not perhaps his most famous works, but worthy of much wider appreciation, reveal the mathematical underpinnings of much of his work, influenced by musical theoretician, Joseph Schillinger. Tchaikovsky’s Valse Scherzo in C major has a unique form not seen anywhere else in Russian waltzes, and was dedicated to a favorite student at the Moscow Conservatory.

On Saturday, we will enjoy Beethoven, Brahms and Gershwin, among others. Beethoven's Sonata No. 1 in D Major was dedicated to Salieri, Beethoven's sometime teacher, and Mozart's great rival. Beethoven composed ten violin and piano sonatas with increasing prominence of the violin, and unusual harmonies. While it’s hard for modern audiences to recognize, these compositions were quite avant-garde for their time. Brahms’ Sonata in A Major for piano and violin was premiered by violinist Joseph Hellemesberger with Brahms at the piano. The composer described it as "so full of melodies that one has to be careful not to step on any"! Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue won first prize at the Paris Conservatory and its fusion of genres, joyous syncopations and foot tapping rhythms have made it an all time favourite, but not often heard played by this instrument combination.

Tickets for the concerts at St. Paul’s are $150, $300 and $400 pesos donation each, and are on sale at the Bookshop in the Biblioteca Pública; Solutions, Recreo 11 and through our website with no booking fee, and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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Pro Musica presents Verdi's Grand Opera Rigoletto at Teatro Angela Peralta
Feb
8
to Feb 10

Pro Musica presents Verdi's Grand Opera Rigoletto at Teatro Angela Peralta

Pro Musica's opera this season will be Guiseppe Verdi's masterpiece Rigoletto at the Teatro Angela Peralta on Friday and Sunday, February 8th and 10th. 2019, both at 5 pm.   It is one of the most popular of the composer's "big three" middle period works, with La Traviata and Il Trovatore.  It is an exciting and gripping opera, resonant with parallels to our own times. 

Set in the grubby world of the Duke of Mantua, a man with few morals and a great deal of power, the action plumbs the depths of nastiness and the bad guy doesn't get his comeuppance. Gilda, the ill-fated daughter of the Court Jester, Rigoletto, is the #MeToo figure in the drama.  Groomed by the predator Duke, her father is so enraged by the seduction that he hires an assassin to kill the monster.  In the shocking climax to the opera Rigoletto unknowingly causes the assassin to murder Gilda instead of the Duke. 

Rigoletto is an opera with extremes, but it also has a sense of moral ambiguity. The grim palace of the Duke is contrasted by the tranquillity and isolation of Gilda, who sings some of the most divine music. Verdi also cleverly gives the despicable Duke some devilishly charming music.  Rigoletto's music is punchier and more declamatory, an uneasy mix of both worlds.  With a finely etched balance between the grand and the intimate, from plush palace to rundown inn, Rigoletto is an opera that has it all.

Many of your favourite singers will be featured in the all-star cast.  Enrique Angeles will sing the title role of Rigoletto, returning after his acclaimed Don Giovanni for Pro Musica last season.  Gilda will be sung by San Miguel newcomer and rising soprano, Annabel de La Mora.  Her recent Rossini Opera Gala conducted by Javier Camarena at the 10,000 seat National Auditorium in Mexico City marked her as one of the country's leading sopranos.

We also have a limited number of VIP Opera packages which include a ticket to the opera with a reserved seat, champagne in the interval, a ticket to our Gala Fundraiser and an invitation to the last night party on Sunday, including food and wine.  These packages sold out quickly last season so buy now on line through the Prom Musica web site.

The Gala Fund Raiser is in aid of our Education Outreach programs and is on Tuesday, 5th February at 5 pm in a fabulous Hacienda in Los Frailes.  It starts with champagne and canapes in the gardens and a short concert by the San Miguel Youth Orchestra. After a three course candle lit dinner with wine the stars of the opera sing. 

Tickets for the opera are $250, $350, $750 and $800 pesos each and are on sale through the Pro Musica website, at the theater box office, at the Bookshop in the Biblioteca Pública; La Conexión - only at Aldama 3, and at Solutions, Recreo 11.

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Atlanta Chamber Players Return after 8 Years for Two Pro Musica Concerts
Jan
31
to Feb 1

Atlanta Chamber Players Return after 8 Years for Two Pro Musica Concerts

The Atlanta Chamber Players will return to San Miguel for two Pro Musica concerts after 8 years. This spectacular ensemble  bring with them a unique combination of wind and brass instruments, and piano, and will perform a wide variety of mesmerizing music on Thursday & Friday, January 31 & February 1, 2019 at 5:00 pm at St. Paul’s Church on Calle Cardo.

 

The Atlanta Chamber Players are musicians at the top of their profession, most of them occupying the first desks in the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra.  This illustrious ensemble, now in its 40th year,  pioneers exciting styles and techniques in chamber music and is widely respected throughout the U.S. From traditional masterpieces to contemporary classics, their overriding mission is to present great works, both familiar and unfamiliar, played with impeccable precision and flair.  Director of the APC, and pianist of the ensemble, Elizabeth Pridgen, has worked extensively with Pro Musica President Michael Pearl to put together two different programs of the most outstanding music for these instruments.

 

On Thursday, listeners will delight in Beethoven, Schumann, Brahms, and more. Like jazz, the great romantic composers improvised, and Beethoven was no exemption, playfully styling and re-styling his luscious Opus 16 Quartet for piano and winds before completing the written version "to the embarrassment of the other players, but to the delight of the listeners".  Schumann composed his famous Fantasy Pieces in two days of intense inspiration which capture the changing moods and personalities of its subjects. The stunning Brahms Horn Trio is one of the great masterworks of writing for winds with its combination of violin, piano and horn. While you could expect the horn to be overpowering, Brahms wrote for the forest horn, which has no valves. In order to create the imagined sound, the player inserts their hand into the bell creating a pure, soft tone.

 

On Friday, we will enjoy works by, Bartók, Mozart and Herzogenberg, among others. Whilst the name may be unfamiliar, we can assure you Herzogenberg’s gorgeous piece of romantic writing is totally delightful with its alluring combination of oboe, horn and piano. The composer was a dear friend of Brahms, and his wife studied piano under Brahms, until the lessons were ended because they were in danger of falling in love! Bartok composed Contrasts with jazz and Benny Goodman in mind, so expect syncopated rhythms! Mozart’s exquisite quintet for piano and winds is a timeless audience favorite. An unparalleled wind composer, this was his first wind composition with piano. Two days after its première, he wrote, "I myself consider it to be the best thing I have written in my life."

 

Tickets for the concerts at St. Paul’s are $150, $350 and $450 pesos donation each, and are on sale through our website with no booking fee, at the Bookshop  in the Biblioteca Pública; Solutions, Recreo 11 , and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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Pro Musica Presents World Famous Russian Pianist Ilya Yakushev
Jan
25
to Jan 27

Pro Musica Presents World Famous Russian Pianist Ilya Yakushev

“Mr Yakushev can do just about anything that he wants” The New York Times said of Ilya Yakushev, and we undoubtedly believe it. This astonishingly talented artist will wow even the most discerning critics with his skill and intonation. Prepare to witness his San Miguel debut for Pro Musica on Friday and Sunday, January 25 and 27, at 5:00 PM at St. Paul’s Church on Calle Cardo.

Yakushev is making waves around the world, mesmerizing and astounding audiences in the finest concert halls on three continents. A Yamaha artist, he his CD of Prokofiev Sonatas gained widespread praise. The American Record Guide wrote of his playing on this disc “Yakushev is one of the very best young pianists before the public today, and it doesn’t seem to matter what repertoire he plays – it is all of the highest caliber”. Since then he has recorded further Sonatas as well as an all-Russian repertoire CD with the British label Nimbus Records.

On Friday, we will enjoy works by Mozart, Beethoven, Liszt, Schumann,. Mozart’s Adagio in B minor was composed during a period of hardship – when Mozart was exhausted by financial struggles and grieving the loss of his father. These feelings are palpable in this work, which is full of high emotion and tension. Beethoven’s "Waldstein" Sonata comes from his middle period when his music changed direction and took the sonata form into new territory, making this one of the favourite piano works of all time. Liszt’s Vallée d’Obermann comes from his Years of Wandering opus, composed during exile in Paris and his "Dedication" is a piano transcription on Widmung, Robert Schumann's elegant love song inspired by his wedding to Clara in 1840. Liszt’s Mephisto Waltz, "The Dance in the Village Inn", was inspired by a story from Faust, and invites the devil and witches to play. This is one of the greatest piano works ever written and requires a virtuoso technique few pianists posses to bring out its true magnificence.

On Saturday, listeners will delight in Haydn, Tchaikovsky, Gershwin, among others. Tchaikovsky’s charming Sentimental Waltz from Six Pieces tugs at the heart strings of romantic nostalgia. His work Dumka in C Minor, is a folk ballad based on a rustic scene. "I love our Russian countryside more than any other, and for me the Russian landscape in winter has an incomparable charm," Tchaikovsky wrote. Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue was a surprise – a news article surfaced saying that he would put on a "jazz concerto" for Paul Whiteman's Palais Royal Band. From this unremarkable announcement came the great work we know today, a fusion of jazz and classical styles.

Tickets for the concerts at St. Paul’s are $150, $300 and $400 pesos donation each, and are on sale at the Bookshop in the Biblioteca Pública; Solutions, Recreo 11 and through our website with no booking fee, and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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Laurence Kayaleh, Acclaimed Canadian Violinist makes her San Miguel Debut
Jan
18
to Jan 20

Laurence Kayaleh, Acclaimed Canadian Violinist makes her San Miguel Debut

Pro Musica presents its annual Canadian Celebratory Concert to honour their many great Canadian musicians who visit San Miguel and as a thank you for our many Canadian audience members and supporters.  The all Canadian line up is led by international violin master, Laurence Kayaleh. Ongakunotomo Magazine of Tokyo described her as conveying “a vast and noble essence, much like a tree stretching and spreading its roots deep into the Earth. She carries herself with the presence and dignity of the great Masters.” Kayaleh will debut in San Miguel for Pro Musica audiences on Friday, January 18 at 5:00 PM and Sunday January 20, at 4:00 PM at St. Paul’s Church on Calle Cardo.

 

Kayaleh will be accompanied by pianist Claire Ouellet, well known for her brilliant technique, and Professor of Piano at the Montreal Conservatory.  Kayaleh's innate musicality and compelling technique comes from a long tradition of violin playing that has taken her around the world, performing in Moscow, Tokyo, Paris, Prague, Caracas, Dublin, Mexico City and Montreal, to name a few. She won First Prize with distinction at the Swiss Competition for Young Soloists, and was awarded the Grand Prize by unanimous decision of the Jury at the Stresa International Competition, Italy. Additionally, she has performed at the Gaveau Hall in Paris, has been a guest of the Lucerne Festival, and played as soloist under well-known conductors and world famous orchestras. As if all of her accolades aren’t enough, she has a notable stage presence, commanding, intimate and unforgettable.

 

On Friday, listeners will revel in Smetana's Aus der Heimat (From my Homeland), Szymanowski's violin Sonata, a Strauss' Sonata, and more. Smetana’s From my Homeland was composed during the 1800s when Europe was breaking into nations, much resembling the borders of today. This piece represents Smetana’s love for Bohemia.  From an early age a precocious Strauss was a gifted performer on both violin and piano, gifts which are readily apparent in his Sonata, no doubt magnified  as it was at this time that  he met the love of his life, whom he married and spent the rest of his life. This Sonata is a tribute to her.

 

On Saturday, audiences will delight in the sweet sounds of Sonatas by Schumann, Brahms and Grieg, among other works. Several Romantic German composers were friends, including Liszt, Mendelssohn and the Schumanns, making a music club of sorts. How nice to collaborate in such a supportive community! Schumman's Sonata in A minor was premièred by his wife, Clara, a remarkable pianist in her own right. Grieg's Sonata No. 3 was his most frequently played and favorite sonata, and the writing was a long drawn out affair reflecting his Norwegian nationalistic sentiments, in a subtle and cosmopolitan work. Brahms' Sonata No. 3 has four, instead of three movements, unlike the other sonatas in this program, and it has always been of the greatest of the sonatas for violin and piano, receiving raptous welcomes whenever it is played.

 

Tickets for the concert at St. Paul’s are $150, $350 and $450 pesos donation each, and are on sale at the Bookshop  in the Biblioteca Pública; Solutions, Recreo 11 and through our website with no booking fee, and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

 

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Acclaimed Amernet String Quartet Return for Two Unforgettable Concerts
Jan
11
to Jan 13

Acclaimed Amernet String Quartet Return for Two Unforgettable Concerts

The Amernet String Quartet has been hailed for its “exceptional technical ability”, “intelligence” and “musical integrity” by the New York Times. Prepare to be dazzled by the “old world flavour” of one of America’s greatest current ensembles as they return to San Miguel for two unforgettable concerts, on Friday and Sunday, January 11 & 13, 2019, at 5pm at St. Paul’s Church on Calle Cardo.

Formed in 1991, while its founding members were studying at the Juilliard School, the Amernet String Quartet quickly gained international fame, winning the gold medal in Tokyo at the International Music Competition. Currently the Ensemble-in-Residence at Florida International University in Miami, they have performed extensively around world, in Asia, Europe, the Americas and the Middle East. They also collaborate with many of today’s most prominent artists, such as the Tokyo and Ying quartets, and push the envelope with new avant-garde recordings, like their album Dissenting Voices which features rare works by important composers such as Shostakovich.

On Friday, audiences will delight in Mozart, Dohnányi, and Beethoven quartets, among others. Mozart's "Hoffmeister" Quartet, possibly intended to be one of the Prussian quartets based on its impressive cello parts, was dedicated to Mozart's friend, Anton Hoffmeister. It remains a stand-alone quartet between the six quartets dedicated to Hayden and the aforementioned Prussian group. Dohnányi was both a spectacular composer, chamber musician and pianist in his time. While composing and climbing in the Dolomites in 1906, he created this Quartet in D-flat. Beethoven's “Harp” Quartet comes from his middle period, focusing on individuality, delving into experimental and avant-garde techniques and concepts. Like Mozart's "Hoffmeister", the "Harp" is also a stand-alone quartet, the first not included in a group.

On Sunday, concertgoers will enjoy Schubert’s, Dvořák, and Tchaikovsky quartets, and more. Schubert’s "Rosamunde" Quartet, composed during a period when he was focused on chamber music, was dedicated to Beethoven's friend, the violinist Ignaz Schuppanzigh, who performed its première. Commissioned by the Hellmesberger Quartet who performed and, in some cases premièred, works by Beethoven, Schubert, Brahms, Dvořák's Quartet in C Major is a compositional gem. Known for his big-hearted ballets and orchestral works, Tchaikovsky's Quartet is an example of how he is able to convey such sentiments on a smaller scale, but still exhibiting many of his grander compositional traits. Not caring for the limelight, he disliked conducting, although he was avidly sought-after, and ultimately gave in, conducting the premiere at Carnegie Hall as an act of duty, inspired by his desire to promote Russian music.

Tickets for the concert at St. Paul’s are $150, $350 and $450 pesos donation each, and are on sale at the Bookshop in the Biblioteca Pública; Solutions, Recreo 11 and through our website with no booking fee, and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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Richard and Mika Stoltzman: The World's Greatest Clarinetist and Marimbist Return to San Miguel
Jan
4
to Jan 6

Richard and Mika Stoltzman: The World's Greatest Clarinetist and Marimbist Return to San Miguel

Two-time Grammy award winning clarinetist Richard Stoltzman and “high-wire jazz marimbist” Mika Stoltzman (as described by the LA Times) will return to San Miguel for two unforgettable concerts. The unusual combination of these instruments is delightfully intoxicating, hugely energetic and always innovative. The illustrious superstars will be joined by pianist son, Peter John, for their not-to-be-missed concerts on Friday, January 4 at 5pm and Sunday, January 6 at 4pm at St. Paul’s Church on Calle Cardo.

Beloved for his captivating stage presence and awesome artistry, when Richard Stoltzman isn’t winning Grammys, performing chamber music or jazz, or recording, he collaborates with his equally talented marimbist wife, Mika. Audiences worldwide rave about her spirited and emotive performances, as well as the unique quality of the combination of their instruments and the interaction that they have on stage. Richard and Mika have been described as having, “amazing versatility and crossover ability … starting off quite conventionally … soon they began adding their own flair to each one” and “showed-off their jazz abilities” (The Boston Musical Intelligencer).

On Friday, concertgoers will delight in Poulenc’s Sonata for Clarinet and Piano. A member of Les Six, a group of young French composers, the composer believed in making music for pure enjoyment. A perfect piece for this concert! The eclectic program includes Brahms’ Lullaby, based on German folk poems and highlights Germany’s romantic tradition, as well as nationalist passions. We will hear several of Gershwin's Preludes, which are both traditional and very much in his own idiom, referencing jazz influences. Add to this Porgy and Bess, at heart a folk opera but now regarded as a major classical work, and you have a fascinating concert to suit all tastes. Not to mention other delights like Debussy’s Première Rhapsody, Ravel’s Pavane for a Dead Princess, Piazzolla’s Tango Étude, Bill Douglas’ Waltz Cantando and Feast, and more.

On Sunday, audiences will delight in Bernstein’s Sonata dedicated to Benny Goodman, with whom he later premiered the Poulenc Sonata featured in Friday’s concert. The wildly popular and brilliant West Side Story, based on Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, will enthrall you in the hands of the Stoltzmans with their special arrangements for these instruments. Bach’s artistic, emotional, and spiritual Chaconne will be performed as well. McKinley’s Mostly Blues, mentioned in the duo’s review (by the Boston Muscial Intelligencer above), will also be played. Other notable pieces in the concert include exceptional original compositions from Charles Ives, the tranquil beauty of Douglas’ Irish Spirit, Piazolla’s Years of Solitude and Fuga y Misterio, and the Mexico premiere of Zorn’s Palimpsest, a unique and eclectic work from a MacArthur fellow.

Tickets for the concert at St. Paul’s are $150, $350 and $450 pesos donation each, and are on sale at the Bookshop in the Biblioteca Pública; Solutions, Recreo 11 and through our website with no booking fee, and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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Four Hands Piano Concerts with Julie Coucheron and William Ransom
Dec
7
to Dec 9

Four Hands Piano Concerts with Julie Coucheron and William Ransom

Get ready for two of the most unique concerts of the 2018-2019 concert season! Four-hands piano concerts featuring acclaimed artist Julie Coucheron, called “exquisite” by the Washington Post, and San Miguel favorite William Ransom, described as a "technical dazzler, and more" by the Detroit Free Press, will inspire listeners through this unusual and challenging form. Don’t miss these one-of-a-kind concerts on Friday, December 7, at 5 pm, and Sunday December 9, at 4 pm at St. Paul’s Church on Calle Cardo.

Four-hand piano music has a long-standing tradition of bringing orchestral music to people who might not otherwise hear it for financial or geographic reasons, and as large scale concert going becomes ever more expensive and remote for most people, this art for has enjoyed a recent resurgence in popularity. Though many four-hand piano works are transcribed, the form also includes many original works, and at these two recitals we will hear the finest examples of both.

On Friday, the audience will enjoy Beethoven’s Sonata in D Major, a product of his late twenties, and a testament to the composer's striving with an almighty passion to make his music accessible, whilst at the same time breaking the mold of traditional compositional forms. Barber’s Souvenirs, written in 1951, hearkens back to the golden days of his childhood and his nostalgia for the beautiful moments he experienced on an outing with his mother to the idyllic countryside. Brahms’ Five Hungarian Dances was inspired by two of his close friends, Eduard Remény and Joseph Joachim, both violinists. The melodies are influenced by Roma folk music which the Maestro adapted to fit his own idioms. The highlight of the program will be a dramatic piano transcription of Beethoven’s incomparable Symphony No. 5.

On Sunday, listeners will delight in Mozart’s Sonata in F Major, a true masterpiece of delicacy and nuanced phrasing. The composer often wrote four-hand piano music with his brilliant sister Nannerl, but he stopped after she died, and returned to the form later in life, leaving us this elegant gem. The strangely unique P.D.Q. Bach’s Sonata Innamorata is meant to seduce and comes from a foray into satirical humor. Transcribed by Peter Schickele, a Julliard graduate, the piece has very curious and playful ideas about instrumentation, which will delight and amuse you. Debussy’s Petite Suite conjures up nostalgia for the “good old days” of France’s golden past, but with the added twist of the composer's 'free form' compositional style . The set piece of the concert will be Saint-Saëns’ joyful Carnival of the Animals, a circus-like romp through a menagerie of musical animals which always delights audiences from 5 to 105 years old!

Tickets for the concerts at St. Paul’s are $150, $300 and $400 pesos donation each, and are on sale at La Tienda in the Biblioteca Pública; through our website with no booking fee, and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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Metropolitan Opera Auditions Winners Concert
Nov
10
5:00 PM17:00

Metropolitan Opera Auditions Winners Concert

This month Pro Musica stages the Metropolitan Opera Auditions for the whole of Mexico when more than 40 singers from all over the country will vie for substantial prize money and the chance to progress through to the Regional Finals of the competition.  The Winners of the Auditions, as well as those receiving Encouragement Awards and Pro Musica's own choice of Voice of the Future, will sing at a Winners Concert on Saturday, November 10 at 5 pm at St. Paul's Church on calle Cardo.  This will be a unique opportunity for you to see the cream of Mexico's young opera singers in a full length concert of arias, duets and other combinations, accompanied on the piano by the inimitable Mario Alberto Hernandez, one of the most distinguished voice teachers in Mexico, who always draws the very best performances out of those he plays for.   

 

This will be the first voice concert we have staged at St. Paul's for at least four years. Nowhere else in Mexico is there such a wonderful combination of being able to hear opera singers up close and personal in a perfect acoustic with one of the finest pianos in North America.  To add to the excitement, Pro Musica has added a Voice of the Future choice to the occasion to acknowledge outstanding potential in a singer whom has not been chosen by the audition Judges to receive an award. 

 

The concert has been sponsored by an anonymous San Miguel resident and, by attending you will also be helping to fund the fees we will be paying to these up and coming singers, who greatly need the means to pursue their careers, where paid professional engagements are few and far between.  The concert will also give the singers a vital opportunity to perform in front of a discerning and, I have no doubt, appreciative audience, a very different experience from the production-line feeling of auditions, where they sing for 3/4 minutes with no energizing audience and no applause.  This is all vital experience for their developments as performers, not least with a view to them giving of their best at the Met's Regional Finals in New Orleans and, hopefully, on to New York. 

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Internationally Acclaimed Violinist Charles Wetherbee to Play San Miguel for Pro Musica
Oct
7
5:00 PM17:00

Internationally Acclaimed Violinist Charles Wetherbee to Play San Miguel for Pro Musica

Violinist Charles Wetherbee, called “a consummate artist... with flawless technique” by The Washington Post, will grace the stage in San Miguel for one unforgettable concert, accompanied by outstanding pianist David Korrevar. Delight in the sumptuous sounds of Wetherbee’s renditions of Respighi, Schubert, Chausson, Sarasate, Albéniz, Paganini, and more on Sunday, October 7, 2018 at 5 pm at St. Paul’s Church on Calle Cardo.

 

A child prodigy and international violin superstar, Charles Wetherbee has performed all over the world with international orchestras and his own chamber music ensembles, Carpe diem, where he plays first violin, and Opus 3, of which he is a founding member. Faculty at CU Boulder, his passion for current music has led him to premiere several major contemporary works in international venues as well as on national media, such as NPR’s “Performance Today”.

 

Sunday’s concert will take listeners on a magical journey through some of the greatest works ever written for the violin. Paganini famously set the bar higher than anyone before him for violin composition. We will hear his Twenty-Four Caprices, a rite of passage for aspiring solo violinists. Paganini’s works require more than spectacular technique: they demand a level of emotive quality few artists can express fully, but which Charles possesses in abundance. Respighi  is best known for his hyperbolic orchestra works but his Sonata is at the other end of the spectrum. It’s as if all the trappings have been stripped away and the composer has left us with only the cleanest, most magnificent lines of the work. Schubert was a famously prolific composer, despite his tragically short life, and he might compose as many as 8 songs in a single day, dashing some of them off in an hour or so. Fantasy is certainly one of those, and it is written at a time of such dazzling productivity that the master at times struggled to recognize his own works! Knowing that he was terminally ill, he created an opus of otherworldly masterpieces, of which Fantasy is certainly one.

 

Chausson's Poème was inspired by a Turgenev short story – love, mysticism, treachery and ultimately murder, were the elements of this powerful piece. Composed and performed in honor of Belgian violinist, conductor, and composer, Eugene Ysaÿe -  an enormously admired character with a large presence and personality - his energy captured the magic of the story.  Sarasate was one of the greatest violinists who ever lived; a spectacular virtuoso..  Also a well known composer of exquisite, but fiendishly difficult, virtuoso violin works, he created Caprice Basque to stretch even his extraordinary technical muscles, so to speak, and also to present an authentic version of himself through the art of his music. Inspired by Spanish music, his influence can be seen in the off-beat accents reflective of flamenco dance. Albéniz's Suite España, including the Tango, was originally written for solo piano but this arrangement for the two instruments charms and delights audiences wherever it is played.  Like Charles Wetherbee, the composer was a child prodigy, from the age of four, but even he did not reach Charles breathtaking record of playing his 1,000th concert before the age of 16!

 

Tickets for the concert at St. Paul’s are $150, $300 and $400 pesos donation each, and are on sale at the Bookshop  in the Biblioteca Pública; Solutions, Recreo 11 and through our website with no booking fee, and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

 

Details of all Pro Musica’s concerts and Patron Membership are on our web site, www.promusicasma.org, or contact us at promusicasma@aol.com

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The Renowned Vega String Quartet Return to San Miguel for Two Concerts
Feb
26
to Feb 28

The Renowned Vega String Quartet Return to San Miguel for Two Concerts

Pro Musica is delighted to welcome the illustrious Vega String Quartet back to the stage after their stunning concerts for us last season! The New York Times gushed that their playing had a kind of clean intoxication to it, pulling the listener along…the musicians took real risks in their music making." The Quartet, consisting of Elizabeth Fayette and Jessica Wu, violins; Yinzi Kong, viola and Guang Wang, cello, returns to San Miguel for two concerts on Friday and Sunday, 26 and 28 January at 5pm at St. Paul’s Church, Calle Cardo.

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What does “Vega” mean, anyway? Yinzi told me “there is an old joke among string quartets that if you can pick a name without breaking up, everything else is easy! When we moved to New York City to continue our education, we studied with the Orion Quartet. We chose our name to also come from a constellation in honor of all we learned, as the Vega star is the brightest in the Lyra constellation.” Currently, the quartet in Residence at Emory, the Vega is inspiring budding chamber music lovers through the interactive community they’ve built and exhilarating performances.

On Friday, audiences will enjoy works by Mendelssohn, Beethoven, and the indelibly talented contemporary artist Tan Dun, among others. Mendelssohn describes his Quartet No. 3 in D Major as being with “passion” because of its vibrancy, intensity, and vitality. The composer first achieved fame with his teenage masterpieces, the Midsummer Night's Dream Overture and the string Octet, and for the rest of his life continued with an outpouring of masterful compositions that are notable for their wonderful melodic lines.  Beethoven’s Quartet No. 7, one of the highlights of the repertoire was commissioned by his patron Count Rasumovsky and incorporates Russian folk melodies at the Count's request. Tan Dun, composer of the cinematic sensation "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon", has also composed award-winning symphonic works, chamber music, and opera.  Influenced by classical Chinese instruments, the Vega will present his wondrous work, Eight Colors.

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On Sunday we will hear Haydn, Bartók, Beethoven and more. Haydn’s Quartet in B-flat Major, La chasse, was probably written in the late 1750's, although the original version of this lovely ABCBA palindrome no longer exists. La chasse earned its nickname for the hunting-horn melody in the first movement. Bartók’s Quartet No.1 shows his contrapuntal sophistication through beautiful organic forms, and is a compelling work. Beethoven’s Quartet No. 13 is monumental; the poet T.S. Eliot wrote, "There is a sort of heavenly …gaiety about some of [Beethoven's] later things which one imagines might come to oneself as the fruit of reconciliation and relief after immense suffering; I should like to get something of that into verse before I die."

Tickets for the concerts at St. Paul’s are $150, $300 and $400 pesos donation each, and are on sale at La Tienda in the Biblioteca Pública; La Conexión; only at Aldama 3; and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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The Internationally Renowned Jupiter String Quartet Debuts for Pro Musica!
Feb
16
to Feb 17

The Internationally Renowned Jupiter String Quartet Debuts for Pro Musica!

“String Quartets, like fine wine, get better with age; the Jupiters are a very fine vintage indeed,” the St. Louis Post Dispatch said of the Jupiter String Quartet, and its star-studded players, Nelson Lee and Meg Freivogel, violins, Liz Freivogel, viola, and Daniel McDonough, cello. Founded in 2002, the ensemble has a mission to widen the love of chamber music to audiences of all ages and nationalities through their very accessible programming, exciting concerts and intimate teaching. San Miguel will host their Mexican debut concerts on Friday and Saturday, February 16 & 17 at 4 pm at St. Paul’s Church on Calle Cardo.

The Jupiter String Quartet is not only a group of gifted musicians, but a tight-knit family unit as well. Violinist Meg Freivogel and her sister, violist Liz Freivogel, and husband, cellist Daniel McDonough join with Nelson Lee to make up the group. The Jupiters are the Artists-in-Residence at the University of Illinois, running their string chamber music program when they aren’t touring the US or abroad. Outreach work is an important focus for them, as cultivating and connecting with the future audiences of classical music is part of their essence. Early exposure to chamber music brought these four passionate musicians together in the first place, and they want to return that gift to others.

On Friday, we will hear Schubert's Quartet No. 15 in G Major and Beethoven's Quartet in A Minor, and more. Schubert, died at the tender age of 31, but was impressively prolific during those short years and, even when close to death, the powerful drama in his last works, like the Quartet No. 15,  belie his poor health. Sickness also struck Beethoven and, in the spring of 1825, his doctor ordered him to leave his city home and moveto the fresh air of the famous Baden Spa area.  The illness continued to frighten Beethoven, and he believed he might die. It was at this time that he wrote the A Minor Quartet, a work almost twice as long as his First Symphony, that documents a journey from darkness into light.

On Saturday, the concert celebrates the 175th anniversary of Schumann's 'chamber music year' (1842) and the centenary of the completion of Bartok's Quartet No. 2, a work whose composition haunted him for two years. Dedicated to the Hungarian Quartet, the quartet artfully displays his extensive knowledge of that country's folk music. Schuman-lovers celebrate this anniversary of his Quartet in A minor, Op. 41, dedicated to his friend Felix Mendelssohn, one of his very few string quartets; they were composed after studying quartets by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven.

Tickets for the concerts at St. Paul’s are $150, $300 and $400 pesos donation each, and are on sale at La Tienda in the Biblioteca Pública; La Conexión; only at Aldama 3; and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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Sensational Israeli violinist Itamar Zorman Debuts in San Miguel
Feb
1
to Feb 2

Sensational Israeli violinist Itamar Zorman Debuts in San Miguel

Itamar Zorman and Kwan Yi debut in San Miguel in two concerts that are sure to be a highlight of the season. Zorman took the world by storm after winning the silver medal in the 2011 Tchaikovsky Violin Competition, where no gold medal was awarded and Kwan Yi is an equally gifted musician; and together they make magic. Don’t miss this magnificent duo perform with two different concerts, February 1st & 2nd, Thursday & Friday, both at 5pm at St. Paul’s Church on Calle Cardo.

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Zorman has a youthful sensitivity; delicate and precise, he connects with his violin as if they are one, leaning into it like a lover, peering upward with a holy gaze and emitting a cacophony of perfectly in-tune notes. There is a natural chemistry between Zorman and the immensely talented Yi; together they make a striking duo, performing often (including a recital in Carnegie Hall) and releasing an album together.

On Thursday, the program highlights include Brahms' Sonata No. 1 in G Majo. Each of the three movements of this sonata share common thematic ideas, and its title, the Rain Sonata, has the meaning of a unified shower of ideas - but expect a sunny performance! We will also hear Dvořák's "Songs my mother taught me", the fourth of seven from his cycle Gypsy Songs. These are set to poems by Adolf Heyduk in both Czech and German. The fourth song, more than any other, has attained far-reaching prominence. Hommage to Charlie Chaplin will be another featured work; it’s not well known that the comedic icon was also an accomplished composer. In fact he wrote, directed, acted, conducted, and scored many of his films. Chaplin began his life in London, growing up in unrelenting poverty with a mentally-ill mother and an absent father and went on to become the cinemas' first superstar who often played the music himself for his "talkies".

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On Friday, concertgoers will revel in works by Schubert and Bartók, among others. Schubert's Sonatina in D major for violin and piano was likely deemed a Sonatina to reduce the pressure on the 19 year composer, though he already had some wildly impressive compositions under his belt, such as the Lieder: Erlkönig and Gretchen am Spinnrade. After a 10 year hiatus from composing for piano and violin, he produced the Rondo Brilliant in B minor for the young violinist, Josef Slavík.  We will also hear Bartók's Rhapsody no. 2 with its powerful folk influences of strumming pizzicatos, but without using the actual folk tunes.  The composer was known for his in depth research and collecting of folk material and his Sonata No.1 in C-sharp minor for violin and piano also reflects this.

Tickets for the concerts at St. Paul’s are $150, $300 and $400 pesos donation each, and are on sale at La Tienda in the Biblioteca Pública; La Conexión; only at Aldama 3; and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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Macondo Chamber Players, Piano Quintet, Return for Pro Musica
Jan
12
to Jan 14

Macondo Chamber Players, Piano Quintet, Return for Pro Musica

Pro Musica welcomes back the exceptionally talented piano quintet, the Macondo Chamber Players. Regarded as one of the most exceptional small ensembles in Latin America, the reputation of these young and talented musicians keeps them in high demand. There is “…something extraordinary, capable of setting new precedents in the musical panoramic of Latin-America,” about them (El Comercio). They will perform two different concerts for Pro Musica on Friday and Sunday, January 12 & 14 at 5 pm at St. Paul’s Church on Calle Cardo.

Four of the group hail from the Americas and one is from Russia. First violinist, St. Petersburg-born Daniel Austrich, integrates seamlessly with the youthful, eclectic group of Latin and North Americans, including Colombian violinists Jose Romero and Raúl García; Dominican pianist, Carlos Vargas; and from New York, cellist Thomas Mesa. Described as having “impeccable technique”, their comparatively young age seems “contrary to the quality of sounds, the precise gestures, the poetic sounds” of their playing (El Pais).

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The classical quintet was established in its most familiar form following the phenomenal success of Schumann's Piano Quintet in 1842, which combined the piano with a string quartet, changing the typical instrumentation of the time. His Quintet, which concert goers will hear on Friday, was created during a happy and prolific time, and dedicated to his muse, Clara.  Love treated Schumann so well he wrote three string quartets, a piano quintet, quartet, and trio in quick succession at this time. The Piano Quintet is an iconic composition which defines the quintet’s role in classical music.

Also on Friday, the Quintet will play works by Fauré, Shostakovich and Golijov. Fauré’s quest for innovation led him through breathtaking and heart-wrenching creations, including our piece, his Piano Quintet No. 1, that haunt listeners’ imaginations even to this day. Shostakovich’s Piano Trio No.1, written while he was still a teen, was inspired by a girl he met in the Crimea, and is a paean to young love. Golijov's Tenebrae, a multi-faceted work of many dimensions, provides contrasts between the macro and micro views of reality.

On Sunday, Franck's Piano Quintet, dedicated to his good friend Camille Saint-Saëns, will be featured. Heavily influenced by his time as an organist, Franck’s work is vivid and dynamic. Bartók's Piano Quintet will be another highlight of the concert in which the composer speaks of the creation of the piano quintet, finding inspiration after a period of stagnation, feeling drawn toward Hungarian folk music and his cultural roots. This is a virtuoso piece that Franck was told would be too difficult to be learned, but today it is part of the mainstream repertoire.

Tickets for the concerts at St. Paul’s are $150, $300 and $400 pesos donation each, and are on sale at La Tienda in the Biblioteca Pública; La Conexión; only at Aldama 3; and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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Edvinas Minkstimas, Lithuanian Piano Sensation, plays for ProMusica
Jan
5
to Jan 7

Edvinas Minkstimas, Lithuanian Piano Sensation, plays for ProMusica

Hailed as one of Europe’s top emerging young pianists, Edvinas Minkstimas’ intuitive interpretation and honed keyboard skills have garnered him invitations to perform throughout Europe and North America, leading him to Mexico where he will make his San Miguel debut for Pro Musica with two different concerts in the intimate venue of St. Paul’s Church on Calle Cardo on Friday, January 5 at 5 pm and Sunday, January 7 at 4 pm.

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Edvinas made his professional debut at the age of 14 performing Grieg with The Lithuanian National Philharmonic Orchestra. He went on to earn his Musical Arts degree from Juilliard , where he received the illustrious C.V. Starr Foundation Doctoral Fellowship. Also the recipient of the Artist Diploma from the Paris Conservatory, his abundant accolades are legion. A Steinway artist since 2013, we are delighted to introduce this talented artist to Mexican audiences for the first time.

On Friday, we will hear Schumann, Brahms, Gershwin, and Liszt. Schumann's Davidsbündler is a musical love letter to Clara, his wife. A concert pianist, composer, and mother of his many children, Clara was his muse and guide. Brahms' Rhapsodies were dedicated to a young savant, Elisabeth von Herzogenberg, with whom he was infatuated. Later in life, they became friends and Brahms' Seven Fantasies, the masterful last works of his life, were composed after a series of tragic deaths, including that of Elizabeth. Gershwin's Preludes follow in the footsteps of Bach, Beethoven, Chopin, Debussy, Rachmaninoff, and Shostakovich, a surprising departure for the young star from his expected genre. Liszt's Spanish Rhapsody is based on the melody of La Folia (madness or folly), a popular late fifteenth-century folk tune.

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On Sunday, concertgoers will enjoy works by Bach, Chopin, Schubert, Liszt, Čiurlionis and Dett. Bach's tremendous Chaconne inspires intense reverence in listeners and musicians alike. Chopin's Scherzo, dedicated to Thomas Albrecht, who persuaded him to stay in Vienna during political upheaval in Poland, is a reminder of the many compositions that might not exist today if he had returned. Liszt's exciting Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2 is a perennial favorite of both musicians and their enraptured audiences. Čiurlionis, one of the pioneers of abstract art in Europe, was a Lithuanian painter, writer and composer, and greatly influenced modern Lithuanian culture. We will experience Čiurlionis's artistic vision through his composition Three Cycles. Nathaniel Dett, an African American composer, rose above racial bigotry because of the unique nature and soulful appeal of his compositions. An advocate of African American rights, Dett's “In the Bottoms," speaks eloquently to racial injustice.

Tickets for the concerts at St. Paul’s are $150, $300 and $400 pesos donation each, and are on sale at La Tienda in the Biblioteca Pública; La Conexión; only at Aldama 3; and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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Celebrate Canada’s 150th Anniversary with Canada’s Bravour Piano Trio!
Dec
1
to Dec 3

Celebrate Canada’s 150th Anniversary with Canada’s Bravour Piano Trio!

Get ready to celebrate Canada’s sesquicentennial with the “flawless technique” and “dazzling panache” (as described by the Toronto Star) of the Canadian wonder: the Bravour Piano Trio! Composed of leading members of Canada’s great orchestras, we come together to celebrate the diversity and virtuosity of these phenomenal talents in two marvellous concerts on December 1st & 3rd, Friday at5 pm & Sunday at 4 pm, at St. Paul’s church on Calle Cardo.

The Bravour Piano Trio represents the collaboration of three of the most exceptionally skilled musicians in the country: Jethro Marks, principal viola with the National Arts Centre Orchestra, Mauro Bertoli, Professor of Piano at Ottowa University, and Paul Marleyn, professor of Cello at Manitoba University. Friday’s concert includes the Brahms Trio, Piazolla's Grand Tango and Schuman's Marchebilder. Sunday's program showcases the Smetana Trio, Mendelssohn's Sonata and Prokofiev's Sonata, among other works.

Violist Jethro Marks was a founding member of the Zukerman Chamber Players, as well as the Principal Violist of the National Arts Centre Orchestra in Ottawa. Born into a musical family in Vancouver, Jethro studied violin as a child, debuting at 17 with the Loudoun Symphony in Virginia with a performance of Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto. Shortly thereafter, he changed instruments, inspired by the viola, and grew as both an independent artist and chamber musician, performing at prestigious festivals and music halls around the world such as Carnegie Hall, Alice Tully Hall, and the Royal Albert Hall.  

Italo-Canadian Pianist, Mauro Bertoli, established his residence in Ottawa in 2009 after taking the international community by storm with his incomparable technique and sensational sensitivity.

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After receiving the first prize in several International piano competitions, he recently debuted at the illustrious International Piano Festival of Brescia and Bergamo. A very active international soloist and chamber musician, the Toronto Star Raved about Mauro’s performance, saying that the author felt "....dazzled by (the) up-and-coming pianist ...with deep musicality...Here is a newcomer to watch out for."

Cellist Paul Marleyn also resides in Ottawa, and mentors an award-winning studio of young cellists at the University. When he’s not touring in North America, Europe and Asia, he participates in a wide array of Summer festivals, including the International Cello Festival of Canada, and guides the Winnipeg’s Agassiz Chamber Music Festival as Artistic Director. A prolific recording artist, he has recorded with an abundance of music labels.

Tickets for the concerts at St. Paul’s are $150, $300 and $400 pesos donation each, and are on sale at La Tienda in the Biblioteca Pública; La Conexión; only at Aldama 3; the School of Arts at the Instituto Allende, Ancha de San Antonio 22, and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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Canada’s Finest, the Bravour Piano Trio, Celebrate Canada’s 150th Anniversary in San Miguel
Dec
1
to Dec 3

Canada’s Finest, the Bravour Piano Trio, Celebrate Canada’s 150th Anniversary in San Miguel

Buzzing with excitement for Canada’s sesquicentennial, we are honored to participate in it with some of the greatest musicians in the country. Delight in the "flawless technique" of pianist Mauro Bertoli, the “burnished… tone” of Jethro Marks, and the "poise and sensitivity" of Paul Marleyn (Toronto star, Chicago Classical Review, The Guardian). Don’t miss this opportunity to celebrate Canada with the classic style of the Bravour Piano Trio on Friday, December 1st at 5 pm and Sunday, December 3rd at 4 pm, at St. Paul’s church on Calle Cardo!

As we dedicate these performances to Canada’s 150th anniversary, it’s interesting to reflect on the role of dedications in music. Of the works that will be played on Friday, Schumann’s Märchenbilder, or Fairy Pictures, has several unique dedications. One dedicatee was Wilhelm Joseph von Wasielewski, a respected violinist, composer, and writer. An intimate friend to the Schumanns, Liszt, and Brahms, the pages of history barely acknowledge him beyond this dedication. Chopin’s Polonaise was dedicated to Joseph Merk, a composer and cellist who had deeply inspired the young composer, claiming that Merk made songs “more beautiful than they really were by his playing, which is so full of soul." Piazzolla’s Le Grand Tango was dedicated to cellist, Mstislav Rostropovich, and was even premiered by him in New Orleans. Shortly thereafter, Piazzolla had a fatal stroke and we lost one of the greatest original musicians. All of these works and more will be featured in Friday’s concert.

On Sunday, we will hear Brahms’ Trio in A Minor, inspired by the beautiful clarinet playing of Richard Mühlfeld, who inspired him  to continue composing. The concert also features Prokofiev's Cello Sonata in C major.  The composer struggled with censorship all of his life because of  his conflicted relationship with the Stalinist government and their control over the arts and all his works are a paen to artistic freedom. The program also includes Mendelssohn’s Viola Sonata in C minor. A child prodigy with an eidetic memory; he played symphonies from memory and learned Greek for fun; the quintessential Renaissance man, writing this impressive piece at the age of 15. Smetana, like Mendelssohn, was also a child prodigy. Sadly, a series of tragic events, including the death of three daughters and his wife, as well as losing his hearing, marred the story of his life. His trio which the Bravour will play was written after the death of his oldest daughter; his incredible suffering seeps from this composition.

Tickets for the concerts at St. Paul’s are $150, $300 and $400 pesos donation each, and are on sale at La Tienda in the Biblioteca Pública; La Conexión; only at Aldama 3; the School of Arts at the Instituto Allende, Ancha de San Antonio 22, and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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Nov
18
5:00 PM17:00

Vienna Kammersymphonie

The Vienna Kammersymphonie, loosely translated as the Vienna Chamber Symphony, will give one concert for Pro Musica on Saturday, November 18 at 5 pm at St. Paul's Church.  The Kammersymphonie is an elite ensemble of six Austrian musicians; string quartet, double base and piano; which specializes in playing full-scale symphonic works with their own arrangements. This is a strongly emerging trend in classical music as more people want to hear their favorite works, but not in an enormous hall and at the price of a visit to the symphony. Pro Musica has been lucky enough to secure the Kammersymphonie as part of their Latin American tour when San Miguel audiences will experience the unique, creamy sound of great Viennese string playing. 

 

The ensemble of impressively gifted musicians comprises Nadja Kalmykova (1st violin), Aya Georgieva (2nd violin), Ljuba Kalmykova (viola), Sergio Mastro (violoncello), Benedict Ziervogel (double bass) and Alvaro Siviero (piano). Founded in 2006, the “Year of Mozart”, they were hailed in Austria as the best performers in an epic year of music-making dedicated to the famed composer, and went on to tour worldwide.

 

As well as performing well known music by the great names, such as Beethoven and Mahler, the Kammersymphonie also specialize in reviving overlooked musical gems by composers whose works are less often performed, for example Erich Korngold and Hans Gál.  Pieces by all these maestros will be highlighted in the concert, including a movement from Mahler's Symphony No. 4. Mahler conducted both the Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic in the early 1900s, and in the Vienna Philharmonic he was unanimously voted to be the Music Director. This caused a stir (and spoke highly of his influence) as Vienna was traditionally anti-Semitic. Under Mahler’s guidance both the Vienna and New York Philharmonic led the world, and continue to do so . The concert will feature the first movement of Mahler's Symphony No. 4. Another beloved work, Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 3 in C Minor will be performed in its entirety. The concerto was premiered in 1803 in a concert of his own works, spurned by a contest between Schickaneder'sTheater-an-der-Wien and von Braun's Kärtnertor-theater.  Expect fireworks from maestro Siviero at the keyboard!

 

Mahler's fellow countryman Hans Gál, fled Hitler, but was interned for a time by the British. A child prodigy, Gál was 13 when he composed the Five Intermezzos that we will hear. The concert also includes Erich Korngold's Märchenbilder, a fitting match to complement Gál's Intermezzi. Korngold was a sensation even among contemporary masters like Mahler, and one reviewer raved about his, “...astounding feats of composition and of piano-playing, in which the composer's age is not to be taken into consideration."

Tickets for the concerts at St. Paul’s are $150, $300 and $400 pesos donation each, and are on sale at La Tienda in the Biblioteca Pública and online through our website on the Buy Tickets tab at the top of the Home Page; and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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Nicholas Kitchen of the Borromeo String Quartet Performs Beethoven Violin Sonatas
Nov
12
5:00 PM17:00

Nicholas Kitchen of the Borromeo String Quartet Performs Beethoven Violin Sonatas

Why is Beethoven such a powerful force, hundreds of years after his death? Widely considered the greatest composer to have lived, Beethoven’s music evokes deep personal responses, and has inspired listeners for two centuries. On Sunday, November 12th at 5 pm at St. Paul’s Church on Calle Cardo, Nicholas Kitchen, revered violinist, will perform an all-Beethoven concert, focusing on some of his best known works.

Nicholas Kitchen’s eclectic musical interests inspired him to create the Borromeo String Quartet, a now world famous ensemble; Living Archive, a project documenting the nature of live music and living classical artists; and MusicKitchen, a program to promote creativity and inspire through music. Currently in Boston, he teaches at the New England Conservatory of Music. A great innovator and performer, he is captivating performer to hear and watch.

Ludwig van Beethoven was the predominant musical figure between the Classical and Romantic eras, establishing his name in music history as no one has since. Nicholas will perform several of his Sonatas for piano and violin. Rooted in the techniques of Hayden and Mozart, he superseded these  delving into concepts of humanism and nationalism, inspired by the literary works of Goethe and Friedrich von Schiller, which he transformed into music of sublime meaning and in so doing brought musical enlightenment to the mysteries of life .

It’s commonly known that Beethoven was nearly deaf by the end of his life. Beginning in his twenties, his hearing loss led him from the spotlight of performance and conducting to composing in private, with many of his most admired works composed during the contemplative and serene period at the end of his life. Known as a virtuoso pianist, few realize that he was a skilled viola player as well, working with the finest group in Europe at the time, the Bonn Court Orchestra.

Beethoven dedicated many works to friends and patrons. His first three violin sonatas were dedicated to Antonio Salieri. Technically impressive and unusual in the equal emphasis of both piano and violin, these sonatas would not have fitted in well with the popular salon music of the time. He pushed the equality of the “duo sonata” a step farther in the Sonata in G Major, dedicated to friend and patron, Archduke Rudolph (as was the so-called "Archduke Trio".) At that time the piano was transitioning into our modern pianoforte and we will hear the wider dynamic range well illustrated by this work. This is all true of the famous and powerful Kreutzer Sonata, dedicated to Rodolphe Kreutzer, a fellow violinist who proved unable to meet the works' technical challenges.  While modern violin students still battle to execute its complex etudes, this is one of Kitchen's favourite works and no violinist living plays it with more passion and virtuosity.

Tickets for the concerts at St. Paul’s are $150, $300 and $400 pesos donation each, and are on sale at La Tienda in the Biblioteca Pública; La Conexión; only at Aldama 3; the School of Arts at the Instituto Allende, Ancha de San Antonio 22, and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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Nicholas Kitchen, First Violinist of the Boromeo String Quartet Make His San Miguel Solo Debut
Nov
12
5:00 PM17:00

Nicholas Kitchen, First Violinist of the Boromeo String Quartet Make His San Miguel Solo Debut

Violin master Nicholas Kitchen will make his San Miguel solo debut with Pro Musica on Sunday November 12th at 5 pm Praised by the New York Times as "thrilling, vibrant and captivating," he is an outstanding virtuoso player. Kitchen is not only a chamber musician, but also teacher, filmmaker, technical innovator and arts administrator, not to mention the founder of the Borromeo String Quartet, and two music education and conservation programs, Living Archive, and MusicKitchen. Amazingly accomplished and wildly talented, this is a unique all-Beethoven concert not to be missed!

Originally from Durham, North Carolina, Kitchen was raised by a family of passionate musicians: his mother, a violinist, founded the String School at Duke and worked closely with the Greensboro Symphony; his father, a choir-master and organist, founded a chamber orchestra at

St. Stephen's Episcopal Church and was also a professor at Duke. Setting the stage for a bright future, Nicholas preformed often at Duke as a child, nurtured by the path of his parents. At the tender age of 16, he began his studies at the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia.

Upon completing his college experience, an inspired Nicholas founded the Borromeo String Quartet, which skyrocketed in popularity, receiving the Cleveland Quartet Award from Chamber Music America, the Martin S. Segal Award from Lincoln Center, and the Avery Fisher Career Grant.  They now play over 100 concerts a year and are the quartet in residence at the New England Conservatory of Music, where Nicholas teaches.

Nicholas has been given a special charge to play and travel with the Goldberg violin "Guarneri del Gesù", on loan to him from the Library of Congress with the intention of moving Mr. Goldberg’s artistic vision forward. For many years, he also played the A.J. Fletcher Stradivarius, but now shares it with his friend, the Borromeo second violinist, Kristopher Tong. He will bring the Guarneri with him to San Miguel.  Kitchen particularly enjoys the Beethoven violin sonatas, which will be strongly featured in his concert on Sunday.

Like most living classical masters, Nicholas has recorded extensively and given concerts in some of the world’s greatest concert halls, premiering new works such as the violin concerto by Stephen Jaffe, which was written for him. But unique to Nicholas are his forays into world music, such as collaborations with Turkish traditional musician Erkan Ogur in Istanbul, drawing animations to accompany live classical performance, and creating a new classical media library to preserve performances of the living artists of today called, appropriately, the Living Archive.

Tickets for the concerts at St. Paul’s are $150, $300 and $400 pesos donation each, and are on sale at La Tienda in the Biblioteca Pública; La Conexión; only at Aldama 3; the School of Arts at the Instituto Allende, Ancha de San Antonio 22, and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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Jenny Lin, Internationally Acclaimed Pianist, plays Liszt, Schumann and Scriabin
Oct
8
5:00 PM17:00

Jenny Lin, Internationally Acclaimed Pianist, plays Liszt, Schumann and Scriabin

Jenny Lin is a surprising and eclectic talent! An immensely gifted Steinway artist, she is also a captivating performer, a world-renowned pianist and an out-of-the-box thinker. This Taiwan-born New Yorker has received rave reviews from the New York Times and the Washington Post (among many others) praising her “remarkable technique” and calling her “one of the most interesting pianists in America right now.” Don’t miss her San Miguel debut at St Paul’s Church, on Sunday, October 8 at 5 pm.

Franz Liszt was the first pop superstar. Mobbed by the music public of his day, he was a greatly revered artist, known for his free spirit, inspiring “Lisztomania”, a term coined by the poet Heine to describe how women reacted to his recitals with absolute hysteria.    All the works featured in Lin’s concert are really fantasies, despite their varying titles. Liszt's Sonata in B minor is no exception, with a long, free-form composition but with thematically connected movements. This structure, coupled with liberty of form, needs a pianist with a phenomenal technique and great inner inspiration to bring out the genius of the piece, allowing the decorative details to meld effortlessly with the overall theme. 

In her concert, Lin will also perform Schumann’s famous, Fantasie, which was dedicated to Liszt, who was also one of the few pianists able to execute the technical challenges of the work.  Liszt never performed it, although he did teach it; but Clara, Schumann’s wife, added it to her repertoire.  Liszt and Schumann were close friends, sharing musical inspirations and dedicating many works to one another, traces of which can be seen peppered throughout their works. The Fantasie was intended as a tribute to Beethoven; but was only completed thanks to a large donation from Liszt. Premiered in 1845, Schumann was too ill to attend its opening and Liszt, who was present, wrote to him: "The Fantasie that you have dedicated to me is a work of the highest rank. I am truly proud of the honour you have done me in dedicating so grand a composition to me…It is a noble work, worthy of Beethoven, whose career… it is supposed to represent".

Scriabin's "Sonata-Fantasy", the second of his piano sonatas, represents 10 individual moments in his stylistic development. The early sonatas were inspired by Chopin and Liszt, although the later ones diverged significantly from the familiar form, allowing for radical exploration. Even in the earliest sonatas, including this, we can see Scriabin’s development of a strong individual voice.

Tickets for the concerts at St. Paul’s are $150, $300 and $400 pesos donation each, and are on sale at La Tienda in the Biblioteca Pública; La Conexión; only at Aldama 3; the School of Arts at the Instituto Allende, Ancha de San Antonio 22, and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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The Great Piano Sonatas in concert with Steinway Artist Jenny Lin
Oct
8
5:00 PM17:00

The Great Piano Sonatas in concert with Steinway Artist Jenny Lin

This is a one off opportunity to hear what the Washington Post describes as “one of the most interesting pianists in America". Jenny Lin has been hailed for her “gift for melodic flow” and “remarkable technical command” by The New York Times. A renowned Steinway artist, Lin’s “confident fingers” and “spectacular technique”;  will make their San Miguel debut at St Paul’s Church, calle Cardo on Sunday, October 8 at 5 pm.

Jenny Lin embodies a surprising amalgamation of qualities and talents. This Taiwan-born New Yorker grew up in Austria; she is as elegant as she is accessible, and in her technique, she is as powerful as she is refined. Gramophone Magazine called her an “an exceptionally sensitive pianist”, however she’s equally known for her charisma and strong stage presence. Additionally, she holds a bachelor’s degree in German Literature from The Johns Hopkins University. Clearly a fascinating woman beyond her immense musical talents, this year will include international tours, including accompanying Phillip Glass in his Piano Etudes, her debut in Lincoln Center’s Great Performers Series, and the release of Melody’s Mostly Musical Day, her illustrated album for children.

To name her accolades would overwhelm the page, but among them are concerts in Carnegie Hall, Avery Fisher Hall, the Kennedy Center, and MoMA, and a multitude of international festivals and concerts. Her discography includes over 30 recordings, and a central role in “Cooking for Jenny” by Elemental Films, a musical documentary about her journey to Spain to meet and work with composer Javier López de Guereña. Recent and popular recordings include, Get Happy, a Broadway tribute with arrangements from many of piano’s greats and “The Spirio Sessions”, a two-piano disc with Uri Caine, and epic renditions of Liszt’s Sonata and Schumann’s Fantasie, both of which will be featured in her San Miguel concert.

All-Music Guide described Lin’s technique as “nothing less than superhuman”. Inspiration and dedication produce Lin’s incredible recordings and performances and Lin is so deeply inspired by the music she interprets that it’s no wonder she leaves her audiences spell-bound. Performing some of her favourites, like Scriabin, Schumann and Liszt for her Pro Musica debut, we know our audiences will feel as inspired as she does. As Gramophone Magazine said of Lin’s recordings of Stravinsky’s solo piano music, it is “another notable achievement from this gifted and imaginative artist.” We can’t wait for you to share in her imaginative gifts as well.

Tickets for the concerts at St. Paul’s are $150, $300 and $400 pesos donation each, and are on sale at La Tienda in the Biblioteca Pública; La Conexión; only at Aldama 3; the School of Arts at the Instituto Allende, Ancha de San Antonio 22, and at the concert 45 minutes before performance time.

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